File properties

File properties are system defined, as opposed to file attributes that are user defined. File properties are hard wired into Boomla and often have special behavior attached. You can set some properties but not all of them.

List of all file properties

  • fileNodeId

  • link

  • type

  • title

  • statusCode

  • body

  • created

  • createdBy

  • modified

  • modifiedBy

  • descendantsModified

  • descendantsModifiedBy

  • attrHash

  • attrSize

  • bodyHash

  • bodySize

  • childrenHash

  • childrenSize

Note that the file name is not a file property. It is the file's address among its siblings. This is important because changing the file's name doesn't affect its fileHash.

fileNodeId string

The fileNodeId is the ID of a file node within a volume. The fileNodeId is unique within a volume but not within a filesystem, which is a tree of volumes.

In comparison, the fileId is like a path, identifying a file node within a filesystem. It is a concatenated list of fileNodeIds.

link string

The link property is a string holding a well-formatted file link.

It is an ASCII string in form LINKTYPE ARGS:

  • LINKTYPE is a valid link type, like package.

  • ARGS is zero or more link type specific arguments. Its size is limited to 65536 bytes.

type string

The type property holds the name of a built-in type or an internal path to a file. Its maximum length is 64KB.

title string

The title property holds the file’s human readable name, possibly with spaces and other special characters. An UTF-8 string, maximum 255 bytes long.

statusCode uint32

The statusCode property stores the status of a file. It may indicate an error. Currently, it is only used for setting the status code of the HTTP response.

Its values follow the HTTP conventions except for the default value 0:

  • 0 means OK which is the default,

  • 200 means OK (it is recommended to use 0 instead),

  • 300 - 399 redirect,

  • 400 - 499 client error,

  • 500 - 599 server error.

See the list of HTTP Status Codes on Wikipedia for more details.

body string

The body is a binary storage area, limited to 10MB.

created uint32

The created property stores a unix timestamp of when the file was created.

createdBy UserId

The createdBy property stores the UserId of the user that created the file.

modified uint32

The modified property stores a unix timestamp of when the file was last modified.

modifiedBy UserId

The modifiedBy property stores the UserId of the user that last modified the file.

descendantsModified uint32

The descendantsModified property stores the unix timestamp when any of the file's descendants was last modified. Removing any of the file's descendants will also update this property, thus it may be greater than the largest modifiedBy property in its subtree.

descendantsModifiedBy UserId

The descendantsModifiedBy property stores the UserId of the user that was last to make a change to any of the file's descendants.

attrHash Hash

The attrHash is the hash of the file's attributes when serialized. It is not guaranteed to be normalized. If two files have the same attrHash, their attributes are guaranteed to match. If two files have different attribute hashes, their attributes may or may not match.

attrSize uint64

The attrSize is the size of the file's attributes when serialized, in bytes.

bodyHash Hash

The bodyHash is the hash of the file's body. It is not guaranteed to be normalized. If two files have the same bodyHash, their bodies are guaranteed to be identical. If two files have different body hashes, their bodies may or may not match.

bodySize uint64

The bodySize is the size of the file's body in bytes.

childrenHash Hash

The childrenHash is the hash of the data structure representing the file's children, when serialized.

childrenSize uint64

The childrenSize property is the size of all serialized data structures required to represent the child subtree of a file, in bytes.

Note: data deduplication is not taken into account here. If you make 100 copies of a 10MB file, it will show as 1GB while in fact it will only use 10MB disk space (plus a little overhead).

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